Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander


Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander

I. Birthing on Country: Maternity Service Delivery Models (2012)

The purpose of this report is to conduct a literature review to support the process of developing and implementing a national Birthing on Country maternity service delivery model that is culturally competent and improves health outcomes for Indigenous mothers and babies.

To access the document, click here.

II. Literature review summary report: Successful strategies to increase involvement in antenatal care and to increase duration of breastfeeding that can potentially be applied to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context (2006)

The purpose of the report was conduct a systematic review of literature which identifies strategies that have been shown to be successful at increasing involvement in antenatal care and also increasing the duration of breastfeeding and to consider the potential application to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context.

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III. The characteristics of culturally competent maternity care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women (2011)

This document identifies the characteristics of culturally competent maternity care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as required under Action 2.2 in the National Maternity Services Plan (NMSP) (AHMAC 2011).

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IV. Improving health in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers, babies and young children: a literature review (2005)

This literature review was designed to collate information on interventions which have been shown to improve health outcomes or intermediate health measures in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers, babies and young children. The review was conducted to provide evidence to contribute to the development of a maternal and child health policy in the Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health.

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V. ‘Closing the Gap’: How maternity services can contribute to reducing poor maternal infant health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women (2010)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander birthing women who live in outer regional and remote areas often receive limited maternity care from a skilled provider while the role of midwives in reducing maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity is underutilised. This paper calls for an evidence based approach for the provision of maternity services in this area and states that service provision should be reorganised to match activity to need through the provision of caseload midwives and midwifery group practices across the country.

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VI. The Experiences of Young Australian Indigenous Women in Pregnancy, Childbirth and Post-Partum Period: a Framework for a Community-Based Model of Care (2003)

This was a qualitative study conducted over a twelve-month period. Participants involved in this study were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women living in the greater Cairns area. Five women who participated in the study were interviewed three times during the study, once before childbirth, after childbirth and six weeks after the birth of their baby. The study identified barriers that exist for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women accessing mainstream antenatal and postnatal services as well as existing barriers with hospital staff. The women also identified the importance of family support during pregnancy, childbirth and the post-partum period.

VII. From hospital to home: the quality and safety of a postnatal discharge system used for remote dwelling Aboriginal mothers and infants in the top end of Australia. (2012)

The objective of this paper was to examine the transition of care in the postnatal period from a regional hospital to a remote health service and describe the quality and safety implications for remote dwelling Aboriginal mothers and infants. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in a maternity unit in a regional public hospital and two remote health centres within large Aboriginal communities in the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. The study found that the quality and safety of discharge practices for remote dwelling mothers and their infants in the transition from hospital to their remote health service following birth need to be improved. The discharge process and service delivery model must be restructured to reduce the adverse effects of poor standards of care on mothers and infants.

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